15 July 2013

UK banking sector assets as % of GDP

Source: taken from BANKING ON THE STATE by Piergiorgio Alessandri & Andrew G Haldane; Bank of England; November 2009.

11 July 2013

The marketisation of academia and its adverse effect on intellectual and methodological pluralism

On the monoculture of american international political economy:

"The monoculture we observe today also seems to me to be the product of a competitive academic environment in which we are compelled to live by the mantra of 'publish or perish'. Eager to make a name for ourselves in an 'evolutionary struggle for journal space' we quickly learn that paradigmatic or methodological eclecticism is a luxury for those with tenure and established reputations."..."We collectively converge, willingly or not, upon a socially constructed conventional wisdom."

Catherine Weaver (Review of International Political Economy 16:1; 2009, page 1)

03 July 2013

The Politics of Temporary Work Deregulation in Europe: Solving the French Puzzle

My latest paper on the politics of temporary work regulation in Western Europe.

Politics&Society
(Published online before print July 2)

Abstract
Temporary work has expanded in the last three decades with adverse implications for inequalities. Because temporary workers are a constituency that is unlikely to impose political costs, governments often choose to reduce temporary work regulations. While most European countries have indeed implemented such reforms, France went in the opposite direction, despite having both rigid labor markets and high unemployment. My argument to solve this puzzle is that where replaceability is high, workers in permanent and temporary contracts have overlapping interests, and governments choose to regulate temporary work to protect permanent workers. In turn, replaceability is higher where permanent workers’ skills are general and wage coordination is low. Logistic regression analysis of the determinants of replaceability— and how this affects governments’ reforms of temporary work regulations—supports my argument. Process tracing of French reforms also confirm that the left has tightened temporary work regulations to compensate for the high replaceability.